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Diamond Madness

Diamond Madness: Classic Episodes of Rowdyism, Racism and Violence in Major League Baseball

William A. Cook, DAAP ’81

For as long as the “Grand Old Game” of baseball has existed there has been a close relationship between the fans and players. Generally that relationship has amounted to harmless hero worship; fathers passing stories of the grandstand heroes of their youth on to future generations of fans. However, at times a dark side has come to the fore in the relationship between fans and players; one that has been rowdy, sometimes racist, sometimes violent and in some cases deadly. Episodes of rowdyism and violence involving fans and players in major league baseball tend to attract wider media coverage and tend to be more controversial than those in other professional sports because baseball is an environment considered to be family oriented and one deeply rooted in American culture through legends, song and verse. Get more about the book.

Bogota by Bus

Bogota by Bus

Doug Taylor, A&S ’71 

In this comedy adventure, two American colleagues set out for some rest and relaxation in Cancun when danger and hilarity ensue. They are diverted into Belize. From there, they find themselves fleeing frantically down the Central American Isthmus, further from Cancun, trying to outrun Nicaraguan authorities, bounty hunters, Colombian rebels, Woonan Indians, a 300-pound jaguar hungry to have them for dinner and a scary cigar smoking brothel madame in caked make-up and fierce stilettos with a score to settle! Get more details.

Lucky Greyhound

The Lucky Greyhound 

Beverly Helmbold Erschell, M (DAAP) ’71

The Lucky Greyhound tells the story of Maple, a greyhound who was born for the racetrack, but who never could win a race. This story outlines the various "careers" that Maple has following her retirement from racing. Each fanciful vignette is illustrated by a beautiful line drawing or painting by the artist-author, UC DAAP graduate and Greater Cincinnati renowned artist Beverly Helmbold Erschell. The book can be read as a tasteful children's story or as a beautiful book for greyhound and dog lovers. More about the book.

The Big Klu

The Big Klu

William A. Cook, DAAP ’81

During the mid-1950s, an unlikely star stood alongside baseball standouts Mickey Mantle, Henry Aaron and Willie Mays--a slugger with a funny name and muscles so bulging that he had to cut the sleeves off his uniform to swing freely. Ted Kluszewski played little baseball in his youth, making a name for himself instead as a hard-hitting football player at Indiana University before showing potential on the diamond and being signed by the Cincinnati Reds. Between 1953 and 1956, no other player in major league baseball hit more home runs than Kluszewski. If not for a back injury, he might have gone down in major league history as one its greatest players. With detailed statistics from both his football and baseball careers, this biography chronicles the unusual odyssey that took Kluszewski to the big leagues and ultimately made him a ballgame icon in the 1950s. More details.

Bogota by Bus

Liberty’s Fallen Generals

Steven Siry, D (A&S) ’86

From June 1775 to February 1781 during the American War of Independence, ten patriot generals died as a result of combat wounds. Their service spanned most of the war’s duration and geographical expanse. The generals were a diverse group, with six born in America and four in Europe, three coming from professional military backgrounds and the rest citizen-soldiers, mostly with limited military experience. As the colonists won their independence, the fallen generals became martyrs for the revolutionary ideals that would inspire later generations throughout the world. Read more.

Less Noise, More Soul

Less Noise, More Soul

David Flitner, M (A&S) ’75

This work features the unique perspectives of highly accomplished performers, engineers and producers on the question of how modern technology has influenced and shaped the way we create and consume music today. Less Noise, More Soul brings together essays by a select group of industry pros who share a wealth of experience, passion and insight into where popular music has been, where it currently finds itself and where pop music is going in the future. Find out more.

Catherine

Catherine

April Lindner, D (A&S) ’98

A Young Adult modernization of Wuthering Heights told in two voices, 20 years apart, Catherine interweaves a timeless romance with a compelling modern mystery. Catherine is tired of struggling musicians befriending her just so they can get a gig at her Dad's famous Manhattan club, The Underground. Then she meets mysterious Hence, an unbelievably passionate and talented musician on the brink of success. As their relationship grows, both are swept away in a fiery romance. But when their love is tested by a cruel whim of fate, will pride keep them apart? Read more.

This Bed Our Bodies Shaped

This Bed Our Bodies Shaped

April Lindner, D (A&S) ’98

Lindner’s second poetry collection was a finalist in the 2011 Able Muse Book Award. This collection is a celebration of the universal human experience — childhood, puberty, parenthood, aging — from a uniquely personal and sensual perspective. Check out more.

Findlay: A Cincinnati Pig Tale

Findlay: A Cincinnati Pig Tale 

Curtis Scribner, JD ’07

Findlay, a small farm pig, dreams of a magical place where pigs can do whatever they want: shop, eat, explore and even find some new pig friends! One day, after hearing a farmer talk about "Porkopolis," Findlay sneaks away to what he believes is the special place of his dreams. Findlay is in for the adventure of his life as he explores "Porkopolis" and finds even more than what he is looking for. Adults and children alike can learn and explore Cincinnati while reading this tale. See the landmarks and sites while taking a tour of downtown Cincinnati, and the neighborhoods of Hyde Park, Mt. Adams and more. Read more.

Standing Together

Standing Together: American Indian Education as Culturally Responsive Pedagogy

Beverly Klug, Ed ’74, M (Ed) ’78, D (Ed) ’83

Heather Sutton, president of the American Indian Education Association, has declared that a "state of emergency" exists in Indian education. This book, which Klug edited and contributed to, explores the education of American Indian students in the United States from the first formal educational efforts of the boarding schools in the latter half of the 1800s; through the present educational system with the problems inherent in the No Child Left Behind legislation and its devastating effects on Native education; on through the hopes for the future and fulfillment of American Indian self-determination including educational endeavors for Native students. Read more about this work.

Innovation Architecture 2

Innovation Architecture Volume 2: A New Blueprint for Engaging People Through Collaborative Innovation

Doug Collins, M (Bus) ’05

How might we create a culture of innovation in our organization? How might we engage people in that culture through the practice of collaborative innovation? Innovation architect Doug Collins has explored these questions with Fortune 1000 companies for the past 20 years. Volume 2 explores new applications of the simple, visual approach to the practice that Collins first introduced in Volume 1. Read more about this book.

When Iran Speaks

When Iran Speaks

Timothy Cator, UC Blue Ash student 

When not going to school and working full time, Cator devotes considerable time to researching and teaching on Hebrew and Greek scriptures. This recent publication, one of three, includes insight into what the Bible might be saying about the conflict currently embroiling Israel and Iran. According to the author, the words are chilling, yet enlightening as readers see how words from centuries ago apply today and can positively affect personal opinions and the foreign policy of nations. Read more about Cator's work.

The Damascus Demise

The Damascus Demise

Timothy Cator, UC Blue Ash student

What is going on with Syria? And with Israel? Cator takes a thought-provoking look at the prophecy of Isaiah 17, with Hebrew explained in very easy terms. The author asks readers to imagine they are a juror, reviewing evidence regarding a well-known event. An easy open-and-shut case gets turned on its head when a second suspect is introduced! Suddenly the jurors experience reasonable doubt, and just when they have that dilemma reconciled, the tables are turned and the jury is on trial. More details.

Transforming Education with New Media

Transforming Education with New Media

Peter DePietro, assistant professor of E-Media

The possibilities that online platforms and new media technologies provide, in terms of human connection and the dissemination of information, are seemingly endless. With Web 2.0 there is an exchange of messages, visions, facts, fictions, contemplations and declarations buzzing around a network of computers that connects students to the world — fast. This book examines the use of new media in pedagogy, as it presents case studies of the integration of technology, tools and devices in an undergraduate curriculum taught by the author, a professor at the University of Cincinnati. More about this author.

Common Core Creativity

Common Core Creativity: Language Arts Fun in the Classroom! 30 Projects and Activities for Middle School ELA

Garrett Carter, Ed '06, M (Ed) ’09

Back with new projects and activities, the author's second book combines the Common Core State Standards with fun in the classroom. This book is comprised of 30 projects and activities that are standards-based and support skill development of the English Language Arts standards as determined by Common Core. The projects and activities, explained in the introduction, are ready for immediate use in the classroom. Student projects and activities include acting out skits, completing smartphone-styled worksheets and graphic organizers, flipping coins, rolling dice and more. Get additional details.

My 100 Hands

My 100 Hands

by Lauryn Marie Burks
Illustrated by Alexandra Hananel, DAAP '11

The story "My 100 Hands" was created by Lauryn Marie Burks, who was 5 years old at the time. Faced with the constant challenge of staying on task and dealing with hurried parents, Lauryn did what all children do. She daydreamed. "My 100 Hands" is a product of Lauryn’s vivid imagination, creative thoughts and language translated on paper by dad, Robert Burks, Jr., Bus '00. The book engages children in a way that opens up their own creativity and imagination. Intended for children ages 3 to 8, the illustrations, by DAAP graduate Alexandra Hananel, aptly denote the colorful images of a young child's universe. Children follow along with Lauryn's fun-filled imagination, as she describes how to put her friendly little hands to work and make life easier. Check out more about the book.

Out in Africa

Out in Africa: LGBT Organizing in Namibia and South Africa

by Ashley Currier, UC assistant professor of Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies

Visibility matters to activists -- to their social and political relevance, their credibility, their influence. But invisibility matters, too, in times of political hostility or internal crisis. Out in Africa is the first book to present an intimate look at how Namibian and South African lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) organizations have cultivated visibility and invisibility as strategies over time. As such, it reveals the complexities of the LGBT movements in both countries as these organizations make use of Western terminology and notions of identity to gain funding even as they work to counter the perception that they are “un-African.” Different sociopolitical conditions in Namibia and South Africa affected how activists in each country campaigned for LGBT rights between 1995 and 2006. Focusing on this period, Ashley Currier shows how, in Namibia, LGBT activists struggled against ruling party leaders’ homophobic rhetoric and how, at the same time, black LGBT citizens of South Africa, though enjoying constitutional protections, greater visibility and heightened activism, nonetheless confronted homophobic violence because of their gender and sexual nonconformity. More about the book.

27 Hours

27 Hours

by Gerald Anderson, Ed '08

In just over a day Earth will be destroyed! The impact of an asteroid on a collision course for Earth will cause an Extinction Level Event. Earth's best scientist failed to devise a way to stop it. With no hope of survival, the leaders of the world inform the planet that they have 27 hours to spend time with family and friends before Earth is destroyed. Christians all over the world question their beliefs while others laugh at them. Parties sprang up everywhere. Sex, drugs and alcohol rule the last hours. Few people seek religion. What would you do...stick to your faith or give into the world? Get details on the book.

Bulls, Bears and the Ballot Box

Insignificant: Why You Matter in the Surprising Way God is Changing the World

by Chris Travis, A&S '01

Best-selling author and pastor Chris Travis offers hope for anyone seeking a life of meaning. In this insightful, soul-stirring book, Travis reveals how God has a way of turning things upside down; he makes the weak strong, the foolish wise, and the insignificant matter. Through powerful true stories — including his own gritty experiences teaching at the most dangerous public school in New York — Travis casts an inspiring vision of how much we matter to God and his work in the world. Read more at his blog.

Bulls, Bears and the Ballot Box

Bulls, Bears and the Ballot Box

by Lew Goldfarb, UC College of Law professor, and Bob Deitrick

The authors call this book a must read for all voters - independents, liberals and conservatives alike. It will certainly challenge your thinking and has the potential to be a game changer for the 2012 presidential election. Bulls Bears and the Ballot Box uses objective economic data to examine which U.S. presidents have been the best and worst economic stewards for our nation, the business community, and the average American family. Which political party has demonstrated superior economic performance while serving in the White House? Which economic principles have led to each president’s success or failure? What have our elected officials and the voters learned from these results? Get more details.

Life is so Daily in Cincinnati

Life is so daily in Cincinnati

by Mary Pledge Peterson, M (A&S) '65

From computer murder to opening day, from the Salchow sisters to the tooth fairy, from Spring Grove biking to CCM's steel drum band, this book is a collection of bits and pieces about life in Cincinnati. Come along with the author for an unusual glimpse of Cincinnati's dailyness. Proceeds benefit Cincinnati Preservation Association.  Get more details on Peterson's book.

Witches

Cincinnati and Soup: A Second Helping, More Recipes From the Queen City

by Cheri Brinkman, A&S '74, MA (A&S) '77

This is the sequel to Cincinnati and Soup: Recipes from the Queen City and Great Soup, Cincinnati's best-selling local cookbook featuring more great stories and food from the 1950s-70s in Cincinnati. Recipes and stories include "The Bob Braun Show," "The Paul Dixon Show," "The Midwestern Hayride" and more "Ruth Lyons" Personalities include Colleen Sharp, Wray Jean Braun, Bonnie Lou and Kennie Price, plus recipes from both the Terrace Garden and Wigwam. The book features stories from WFIB  at UC when the station manager was Dean and students were literally "livin on the air in Cincinnati."

Innovation Architecture

Innovation Architecture: Practical Approaches to Theory, Collaboration and Implementation

by Doug Collins, M (Bus) '05

This book offers a blueprint for people who lead the practice of collaborative innovation within their organization. The work serves as a practical companion to anyone who has decided to realize their potential for leadership and to help others do the same through the practice of collaborative innovation. The blueprint helps readers map their goals from the collaborative space they create to the campaigns they lead in a clear, succinct way. Practice leaders can use the blueprint to capture their vision and share their perspective on a page. More details on Amazon.

Sports Fundraising

Sports Fundraising: Dynamic Methods for Schools, Universities and Youth Sport Organizations

by David Kelley, CECH adjunct instructor

Sports Fundraising is a complete introduction to fundamental principles and best practice in sports fundraising. Focusing on the particular challenges of fundraising in intercollegiate, interscholastic and youth sport organizations, the textbook is designed to help students develop the professional skills that they will need for a successful career in sports or education administration. Get more details.

Witches

Witches! The Absolutely True Tale of Disaster in Salem

Rosalyn Good Schanzer, DAAP '64

One freezing winter night in the little Puritan farming town of Salem Village, Massachusetts, two young girls began to twitch and choke and contort their bodies into strange abnormal shapes and speak in words that made no sense. Their family tried every remedy in the book. They fasted and prayed, but nothing worked. Finally, a doctor pronounced his dire diagnosis: the girls were BEWITCHED! And then the accusations began. The riveting true story of the victims, accused witches, crooked officials and mass hysteria that turned a mysterious illness affecting two children into a witch hunt that took over twenty people's lives and ruined hundreds more unfolds in chilling detail in this young adult book by award-winning author and illustrator Rosalyn Schanzer. Among many other awards, "Witches" was named a New York Times Best Book of 2011. Find out more about the author and her many other books.

Legendary Locals of Cincinnati

Legendary Locals of Cincinnati

Kevin Grace, MA (A&S) '77, university archivist and head of UC’s Archives and Rare Books Library

Grace's latest book reveals the educators, politicians, medical pioneers, civil rights leaders, philanthropists, entertainers, sports figures, beer barons and characters – some well known and some unknown – that defined the city of Cincinnati. The University of Cincinnati is prominently represented in its ties to the people who shaped the Queen City. Out of the 150 people featured, more than 70 hold ties to UC. Read more about the book.

Lunch Bucket Paradise: A True-Life Novel

Lunch Bucket Paradise: A True-Life Novel

Fred Setterberg, A&S '75

It's 1950, and the great suburban experiment has begun. A new house with three small bedrooms, a garage where you can spend all Saturday tuning up the Chevy or Ford, the promise of a sycamore blooming someday out front by the edge of the postage-stamp, golf-course green lawn. Working people never had it so good. At least, for now.  But over the next twenty years, life will change for the narrator's blue-collar family as tract homes proliferate, wages soar and then collapse, the inner cities burn, and another war begins in a faraway place called Vietnam. Lunch Bucket Paradise is a rare find, a book that in so many scenes and shades of story has an eerie prescience for the future of California, even as Fred Setterberg helps us to remember the state's time of innocence and boom and new asphalt and post-war, all laid over the landscape of possibility. Get more about the book.

The Invisible Chain That Enslaves Us

The Invisible Chain That Enslaves Us
The Clergy's Misuse of the King James' Version of the Bible

Haywood Turrentine, A&S '74

Do you wonder if the Bible, the one book most accepted as the word of God is truly from that divine source? Most churches base their teachings on the King James Version and tout it as the one and only true word of God. But is it? This book takes a hard look at this issue and reveals little-known facts about other translations and other writings that have been discovered by historians and theologians to be the word of God. Before King James commissioned his translation, what other versions existed and where did they originate? Turrentine's years of study about the various writings that exist creates a new understanding of how the clergy misuses the King James Version to suit their own beliefs and agendas. More about the book.

Design Elements: Form & Space

Design Elements: Form & Space

Dennis Puhalla, DAAP '72, professor emeritus of design

Design principles never change. They serve as the foundation of the designer's thought process and are the essential tools that define a visual language. With hundreds of fundamental principles for creating successful design compositions, this work establishes a basis for visual organization strategies and serves as a comprehensive manual for graphic designers. Understanding how elements interact in a layout is a critical step in stimulating visual thinking and compositional decision-making, and this book illustrates these principles in numerous diagrams, drawings, and practical examples of application. You'll also learn how conventional color harmonies effect form and space and how to apply elements to images and type to create balanced layouts. Plus, the authors hopes readers will gain a deeper aesthetic understanding of form in the context of ordering space.

The ABC's of Site Selection

The ABC's of Site Selection

Frank Raeon, A&S '74

Designed to help business people succeed, this work provides the tools they need to make "smart" location decisions for their retail and restaurant businesses. Site selection is neither an art nor a science. Rather, it is a combination of both. In the long run, doing homework is the only way to justify making what will surely turn out to be a major financial investment. Readers looking for help finding the ideal location will benefit from Raeon's six keys and the site selection scorecard.

Mark Hutker's book, Herilooms to live in

Heirlooms To Live In

Mark Hutker, DAAP '82

The 25 diverse residential projects represented in this stunning book illustrate a process, not a preordained style. The common thread through Hutker Architects more than 200 homes in coastal New England is use of the life equity principle: a home should generate social and emotional equity over time. The conversation between the architect and each client unveils how to design and build this home once well to ensure positive, enduring social and emotional outcomes. A home with life equity provides for the owner’s long term needs both physical and psychological, uses materials best suited to the spaces needed and accommodates ever-changing family arrangements. Hutker homes fit clients so well that they are rarely sold outside the families that build them. Whether small or large, owners treat these homes as heirlooms to be preserved and handed down to the next generation.
Read 2002 feature story on Hutker.
Check out the firm's website.

Going the Distance

Go The Distance: A True Story of a Father and Son's Road to Recovery

by Jim Serger, A&S '67, and Jim Serger Jr., Univ. '91

Jim Serger Jr. shares how far he and his family went to save the relationship with his father, through his dad's battle with his disease. This is a heartfelt and personal journey; one that will resonate with anyone who has struggled to pull a loved one from the depths of addiction back into the joy of life. Jim Serger was a third baseman for UC in the 1960s who hit a homerun to put the Bearcats within a series of the College Baseball World Series. He includes an entire chapter about UC baseball as well as a great deal throughout the book about the Cincinnati area. Get more details about the book.

Cincinnati's Historic Findlay Market

Cincinnati's Historic Findlay Market

by Liz Tilton, MA (A&S) '03, PhD (A&S) '08

It's not individual people or events that have made Findlay Market so special to Cincinnati; instead, in an age when technology allows for rapid flux and change, it is the stability of generations of family businesses and generations of family shoppers who continue to meet every week and exchange produce or meats or dairy products across Findlay Market counters that makes it unique. Established in 1852, Findlay Market is Ohio's oldest public market in continuous operation. The market was originally opened outside Cincinnati's city limits---in an area referred to as the Northern Liberties. Because the Northern Liberties lay just beyond city jurisdiction, the area was then known for a host of social liberties, such as prostitution, bootlegging and thievery taken there. Findlay Market was born to this rebellious spirit, a spirit which may account for one reason it has become such a beloved Cincinnati institution. Get more details about the book.

Proof of Heaven

Proof of Heaven

by Mary Curran Hackett, English adjunct

He might be young, but Colm already recognizes the truth: that he's sick and not getting better. His mother, Cathleen, fiercely believes her faith will protect her ailing son, but Colm is not so sure. With a wisdom far beyond his years, Colm has come to terms with his probable fate, but he does have one special wish. He wants to meet his father who abandoned his beloved mother before Colm was born. But the quest to find the dying boy's missing parent soon becomes a powerful journey of emotional discovery — a test of belief and an anxious search for proof of heaven. One reviewer called the debut novel "a beautiful and unforgettable exploration of the power of love and the monumental questions of life, death and the afterlife." Read more about the book and the author at her website.

Beer Book

Beer: A Genuine Collection of Cans

Dan Becker, DAAP '09, and Lance Wilson, DAAP '09

Ever crack open a can of Chief Oshkosh of Wisconsin, or sample Pabst's Big Cat Malt Liquor? Remember the original St. Pauli Girl, Tennent's bevy of lager lovelies or Olde Frothingslosh ("the pale stale ale with the foam on the bottom")? Presented alphabetically by brand, the nearly 500 cans collected here come from 30 countries and range from the iconic to the obscure to the downright bizarre. From long-forgotten brews to classic brands that have changed their look but never gone out of style, Beer offers a peek into the last century of beer culture, exploring what we drank, how we drank it and why we picked it off the shelf. While it may not be as refreshing as a frosty cold can of Bud, cracking open this book is certain to stimulate beer lovers and design fans alike. Connect at the book's Facebook page or read more in this profile.

Price's Lost Campaign: The 1864 Invasion of Missouri

Price's Lost Campaign: The 1864 Invasion of Missouri

Mark A. Lause, history professor

In the fall of 1864, during the last brutal months of the Civil War, the Confederates made one final, desperate attempt to rampage through the Shenandoah Valley, Tennessee and Missouri. Price's Raid, the last of these attempts, has too long remained unexamined by a book-length modern study, but now Civil War scholar Mark A. Lause examines the problems during the campaign and the myths propagated about it. He provides new understanding of the two distinct phases of the campaign and shows that both sides used self-serving fictions, including the term raid, to provide a rationale for their politically motivated brutality.

Come Back Early Today: A Memoir of Love, Alzheimer's and Joy

Come Back Early Today: A Memoir of Love, Alzheimer's and Joy

Marie Marley, CCM '73, M (CCM) '75, D (CCM) '78

Come Back Early Today tells the story of the author's 30-year relationship with Edward Theodoru, PhD, a delightfully colorful, wickedly eccentric and considerably older Romanian gentleman and their subsequent triumph over his Alzheimer's disease. Their story shows that love can adapt and endure despite all obstacles, and that there can be hope - even joy - amidst the darkness of dementia. The narrative is interspersed with inspirational guidance and advice for caregivers everywhere. Both Marley and Theodoru earned PhDs at the University of Cincinnati in the 1970s. More about the book and author.

A Clockwork Counterpoint: The Music and Literature of Anthony Burgess

A Clockwork Counterpoint: The Music and Literature of Anthony Burgess

Paul Phillips, CCM '82

This is the first book to examine the musical side of Anthony Burgess, an astonishingly prolific and talented composer, revealing how his lifelong involvement in music is an essential key toward understanding his life and work. Whether explaining the sonata form structure of "A Clockwork Orange" or the musical underpinnings of dozens of his other novels, his distinctive views on the interrelationship between music and literature, music's role in his ties to his father and wives, or what his compositions tell us about his troubled relationship with his son, "A Clockwork Counterpoint" illuminates Burgess's dual creative life, providing the first complete portrait of a prodigious artist whose musical accomplishments have remained largely unknown until now. More about the author.

Advertising in the Age of Persuasion: Building Brand America, 1941-1961

Advertising in the Age of Persuasion: Building Brand America, 1941-1961

Dawn Spring, D (A&S) '09

During the 1940s and 1950s, American advertisers made themselves vital to business, media, government, and religious institutions. They envisioned an American-led global consumer order supported by advertising based media where the brand took precedence over the corporation that owned it, and advertising, propaganda, and public relations were considered the same thing. To support these ideas and ensure that the advertising industry remained of value, they established relationships with the federal government and national security agencies, developing a network and process for disseminating persuasive information that survives into the twenty-first century. Get more details about the book.

Bandits, Farmers, Military Leaders, Patriots, Politicians and Prophets

Bandits, Farmers, Military Leaders, Patriots, Politicians and Prophets

Retracing the Vanishing Footprints of our Ancestors

Louis E. Adams, emeritus professor of medicine

One interpretation of early American history suggests that many of the immigrants who fled Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries were seeking freedom from the intolerable social, economic and religious injustices that were prevalent at the time. Even after arriving here, they encountered more hardship. They had to overcome what seemed to be, at times, insurmountable obstacles in their day-to-day survival. Some of the tragedies and heartaches of our ancestors can be reviewed from limited records, while most of the information can only be retold from hearsay stories passed down from generation to generation. Such may be the history, and could well symbolize the migration patterns of the Adams, Cannon, Hobson and Pattie families presented in this book.